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The Cremation Process

Because Life Matters...

Cremation in North Carolina

North Carolina law requires a waiting period of 24 hours following death before a cremation can take place. A cremation authorization and a body identification form must be signed by the next of kin. The body is delivered to the crematory in a cremation container. This container could be the casket used at the funeral or a rigid, leak resistant, combustible box designed for cremation. The human remains and the cremation container are placed in the cremation chamber where open flames raise the temperature to 1600-2000 degrees Fahrenheit for a period of two to three hours. During the process, it may become necessary to open the cremation chamber and reposition the body to facilitate a complete cremation. Afterwards, only bone fragments and any metal remain. The bone fragments are processed to a final granular and powdered form by a mechanical processor. Depending on the skeletal frame, the cremated remains will weigh from three to nine pounds and in most cases will fill a space approximately 6x6x6 inches. While extreme care is used in removing the cremated remains from the cremation chamber and from the processing equipment, it is virtually impossible to remove all particles. Therefore, it is likely that there will be incidental commingling of ashes from cremations that have been done prior and will be additional incidental commingling with ashes from cremations that follow.

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